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Motorola Razr successor patent shows touch sensors on the sides

25 November 2019 0

Motorola's first foldable smartphone named Motorola RAZR launched about 10 days ago. It received a lot of positive feedback not only because of the nostalgia connection but due to the design and Motorola's approach towards foldable phones. It is set to go on preorders from next month but Motorola has already started working on its next-gen foldable offering.

A new Motorola patent has been spotted by LetsGoDigital that offers an idea of what to expect from the RAZR successor. The core design shown in the patent application is the same as the Motorola RAZR. It means it has the same clamshell design and also folds the same way.


The biggest change included in the patent is the addition of touch-based sensors. There are a total of four sensors available on either side of the phone's hinge. It is said that these sensors will offer 20 different gestures and 20 different actions that will allow users to perform a number of tasks with ease. Users will be able to use 13 of these gestures when the phone is unfolded state and the remaining seven when the device is folded.

The exact functionality of these gestures is currently unknown but it does seem to be a useful function. Since this is a patent application, it is hard to see if it will actually turn into a real product. If there are any new reports or any kind of information, we will keep you posted.

The Motorola Razr 2019 isn't still available. To be notified when it becomse available click here.

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