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Google Maps gets new departure and arrival time feature

22 January 2019 2

Google has rolled out a number of new features in Google Maps for users over the past few months. Over the last 2 days, the company has announced two really important features which include the speed trap cameras and speed limits while driving.

Now the company has announced a third feature which allows you to set your departure or arrival time, as well as get an estimation of how long your route will take. The setting departure and arrival times feature has been available for a long time in Maps on the desktop for all modes of navigation, however on the mobile app, it was limited to public transport only till now. The latest version 10.8.0 of Maps finally adds the option.


Users can download the latest version of Apps, and find the feature under the overflow menu on the top right corner when they check for step-by-step directions. Users simply need to pick any date and time and get an estimation of the time it will take to complete the journey as a check when they will arrive at a destination, or even when they should start to reach their destination at a particular time.


There are no alerts or reminders as of now, which will tell you what time you need to start for your journey. Plus, it is also impossible to keep monitoring the traffic situation, in case of unexpected jams which would require you to change your departure time.

You can check out the new feature in Google Maps v.10.8.0, currently, the update is available in beta on the Play Store and on APK Mirror.


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Google Maps gets a new departure and arrival time feature
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